Refrigeration

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

 man at sailboat helm

Why you shouldn’t run your Frigoboat Keel Cooled system out of the water

“You’ve been a very naughty boy, Tompkins, and you must take your punishment. Disobedience has consequences.” So says the headmaster in a typical schoolboy romp in the boys’ magazines of my youth. A few whacks from a cane and life goes on, although these days I suspect it might be a virtual whacking incorporating a VR headset.

Unfortunately, some misdeeds require considerably more than just a simple fix, especially some of the mistreatment we see Frigoboat systems subjected to. Sometimes it’s accidental, sometimes it’s over-enthusiasm, but sometimes people also simply ignore the manufacturers’ instructions.

The Frigoboat Keel Cooler refrigeration system is a case in point. The actual Keel Cooler component is a condenser/heat exchanger that is the external component of a thru-hull fitting and is mounted on the exterior of the boat, under water, and is designed and engineered to be in operation only when the vessel is in the water.

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Holding Plates Museum

And so it came to pass that the days of the holding plates in marine refrigeration systems has come to an end. Amen to that!

Holding plates piled500x479Our “collection” of these expensive, heavy, and cumbersome hunks of stainless steel is now destined for the scrap pile. This long overdue but necessary move will free up valuable warehouse space for more of the aluminum flat-plate evaporators that have all but replaced the holding plate.

But for those of you unfamiliar with these items we should look at what exactly a holding plate is/was.

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

people jumping off boat 2

Some people would like to have their boat’s refrigeration run both air and water cooled, feeling that two methods of heat exchange is better than one. Well, yes and no.

If your refrigeration system needs both to get your box down to set point, then yes, you need to use both, or get a new system.

However, if your system works fine using either one method or the other, then no, you don’t need both to run at the same time, but you still may want both methods available on board your boat.

If you want the flexibility of choosing which heat exchange method to use, then yes, having both in a single unit is good. But why would you want that choice and when would you choose one over the other?

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Family enjoying ice cream onboard boat

The debate rages on. Which is best: air cooling or water cooling for marine refrigeration systems?

A refrigeration system doesn’t “make cold”, it removes heat from one area and transfers it to another. There is actually no such thing as “cold”, just heat at different temperatures: cold heat, warm heat, hot heat, etc.

In our small marine refrigeration systems, this heat transfer is accomplished using a compressor and a refrigerant to collect heat from inside an insulated space and disperse it somewhere else via the magic of latent heat. The evaporator is the “heat collector” inside the insulated box while the condenser is the component that disperses that heat elsewhere. While the evaporator is specific for the size and configuration for the application, there are choices to be made regarding condensers and the medium they disperse the heat into.

But first, let's watch a demonstration of how a Frigoboat Keel Cooler System works in extreme tropical water conditions. Then we will discuss how this can be.

© 2021 Coastal Climate Control - All Rights Reserved | ADMIN